* * * * * * * *

  “AS OF THIS WRITING 2,802 young Americans have been killed during three and a half years of war in Iraq. That’s roughly the same number killed at Iwo Jima during the first three and a half days of fighting against the Japanese. Every life lost was precious and every loss grievous to those who loved them.


Unfortunately, our media intends to use every one of those killed to make their point . It’s a lesson they learned in Vietnam. On Feb. 27, 1968, after a month of brutal fighting and daily images of U.S. casualties on American television, Walter Cronkite , then the host of the CBS Evening News -proclaimed that the Tet Offensive had proven to him that the Vietnam War was no longer winnable.. . It didn’t matter that Tet had been a decisive victory for the United States and South Vietnam. Today’s potentates of the press are trying to deliver the same message: tha t Iraq, like Vietnam, is un-winnable. One television network has gone so far as to broadcast images of U.S. troops being killed by terrorists—making Iraq the first war where Americans get their news from the enemy. The war in Vietnam wasn’t lost during ‘Tet 68’ no matter what Cronkite said. Rather, it was lost in the pages of America’s newspapers, on our televisions, our college campuses—and eventually in the corridors of power in Washington. We need to pray that this war isn’t lost the same way.”                                                      —Oliver North




THE GIPPER


‘Sometimes it seems [the news media] are less interested in legitimate news than they are in proving their knowledge and wisdom is superior to ours. The most frustrating thing is when I have the facts to prove them wrong but cannot reveal those facts without endangering security or wrecking some plan we’re engaged in.”                                                                                       —Ronald Reagan 




Papers from Iraq


W AR-TORN IRAQ HAS ABOUT 26 MILLION RESIDENTS, A PEACEFUL CALIFORNIA PERHAPS BY NOW 35 MILLION.


 The former is a violent and impoverished landscape, the latter said to be paradis e on Earth. But how you envision either place to some degree depends on the eye of the beholder and is predicated on what the daily media appear to make of each.


As a fifth-generation Californian, I deeply love this state, but still imagine

what the reaction would be if the world awoke each morning to be told that once again there were six more murders , 27 rapes, 38 arsons, 180 robberies, and 360 instances of assault in California — yesterday, today, tomorrow, and every day . I wonder if the headlines would scream about “Nearly 200 poor Californians butchered again this month!”


How about a monthly media dose of “600 women raped in February alone!” Or try, “Over 600 violent robberies and assaults in March, with no end in sight!” Those do not even make up all of the state’s yearly 200,000 violent acts that law enforcement knows about.


Iraq’s judicial system seems a mess. On the eve of the war, Saddam let out 100,000 inmates from his vast prison archipelago. He himself still sits in the dock months after his trial began. But imagine an Iraq with a penal system like our California’s with 170,000 criminals — an inmate population larger than those of Germany, France , the Netherlands, and Singapore combined.


Just to house such a shadow population costs our state nearly $7 billion a year — or about the same price of keeping 40,000 Army personnel per year in Iraq. What would be the image of our Golden State if we were reminded each morning, “Another $20 million spent today on housing our criminals”?


Some of California’s most recent prison scandals would be easy to sensationalize: “Guards watch as inmates are raped!” O r “Correction officer accused of having sex with underaged detainee!” And apropos of Saddam’s sluggish trial, remember that our home state multiple murderer, Tookie Williams, was finally executed in December 2005     26 years after he was originally sentenced.


M uch is made of the inability to patrol Iraq’s borders with Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Turkey. But California has only a single border with a foreign nation, not six. Yet over 3 million foreigners who snuck in illegally now live in our state. Worse, there are about 15,000 convicted alien felons incarcerated in our penal system, costing about $500 million a year. Imagine the potential tabloid headlines: “Illegal aliens in state comprise population larger than San Francisco! ” or “Drugs, criminals, and smugglers given free pass into California!”


Every year, over 4,000 Californians die in car crashes nearly twice the number of Americans lost so far in three years of combat operations in Iraq. In some sense, then, our badly maintained roads, and often poorly trained and sometimes even intoxicated drivers, are even more lethal than Improvised Explosive Devices. Perhaps tomorrow’s headline might scream out at us: “300 Californians to perish this month on state highways! Hundreds more will be maimed and crippled!”


In 2001, California had 32 days of power outages, despite paying nearly the highest rates for electricity in the United States. Before complaining about the’ smoke in Baghdad rising from private generators, think back to the run on our generators in California when they were contemplated as a future part of every household’s line of defense.


We’re told that Iraq’s finances are a mess. Yet until recently, so were California’s. Two years ago, Governor Schwarzenegger inherited a $38 billion annual budget shortfall. That could have made for strong morning newscast teasers: “Another $100 million borrowed today — $3 billion more in red ink to pile up by month’s end!”


So is California comparable to Iraq? Hardly. Yet it could easily be sketched by a reporter intent on doing so as a bankrupt, crime-ridden den with murderous highways, tens of thousands of inmates, with wide-open borders.


I myself recently returned home~to California, without incident, from a visit to Iraq’s notorious Sunni Triangle. While I was gone, a drug-addicted criminal with a long list of convictions broke into our kitchen at 4 a.m., was surprised by my wife and daughter, and fled with our credit cards, cash, keys, and cell phones.


Sometimes I wonder who really was safer that week.


©2006 Victor Davis Hanson



bar_blbk.jpg - 5566 Bytes

Return to the words of wisdom, famous people index..

Return to the words of wisdom, good stuff index..

Return to the main menu..

D.U.O Project
Church of the Science of God
La Jolla, California 92038-3131
(858)220-1604

Church of the Science of GOD, 1993
Web Designed by WebDiva