finance, wealth, the wealth gulf, the rich

D URING THE SECOND HALF OF THE 20-TH CENTURY THE WORLD WAS EMBROILED IN A COLD WAR AND THUS DIVIDED POLITICALLY INTO THREE PARTS. -


The world of Communism, chiefly embodied in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and the world of non-Communist nations, led by t he United States, stared at one another across an invisible Iron Curtain. Nations not aligned with either side formed the so-called “THIRD WORLD.


The term “Third World” later came to be viewed as a derogatory description, however, and was replaced with “Underdeveloped Nations.” With time, this too took on negative connotations, for which reason economists began using the term “Developing Nations.” Thus the terminology moved away from emphasizing political differences, and more toward pointing up economic ones.


Now in the 21 st century , a world divided into the above-mentioned three political parts no longer exists


In an economic and industrial sense, however, the differences between developed and developing nations are still a reality. Tourists from affluent lands are now rubbing shoulders with economically less fortunate individuals struggling to put food on their table.


Therefore, the question is very relevant : Is the world destined to remain economically divided, or can those who have, the wealthy, and those who have not, the poor, achieve parity by enjoying a common standard of living?



R REGARDLESS OF THE TERMINOLOGY USED TO DESCRIBE THEM, HIGHLY DEVELOPED , INDUSTRIAL , AND ECONOMICAL LY ADVANCED NATIONS BOAST HIGH LIVING STANDARDS, WHEREAS THOSE WITH LESS INDUSTRY, WHICH ARE THUS LESS DEVELOPED ECONOMICALLY, MAKE DO WITH LOWER STANDARDS. IT IS ALMOST AS THOUGH THEY DO BELONG TO TWO DIFFERENT WORLDS.


Of course, even within one nation , these two worlds may, and do, exist. Think of the comparatively affluent countries mentioned in the previous article. These have both their rich and their poor.


In the United States, for example, about 30 percent of the nation’s total income goes into the pockets of the upper 10 percent of households . At th e very same time, the lower 20 percent of households must make do with just 5 percen t of the total income . This situation or one similar to it may exist in the country where you live, especially if the middle class there is small. But even governments in countries with a comparatively large middle class have until now been unable to bridge completely the economic gap between those who have and those who have not.


wealth by country


NEITHER WORLD IS IDEAL


Neither world can rightfully lay claim to perfection. Think of the obvious disadvantages of those living in poorer countries. Health care is seriously limited. Whereas the 9 richest countries mentioned in the chart above boast 1 physician for every 242 to 539 inhabitants, the 18 poorest countries fall far behind, with just 1 physician for every 3,707 to 49,118 of their citizens.


So, understandably, the life expectancy of the more affluent countries is 73 years or above, whereas in more than half of the poorest, life expectancy is well below 50 years.


SOURCE:

AWAKE Magazine

November 8. 2005 (pgs. 3-5)

          Jahovah’s Witnesses

          Wallkill, NY. 12589



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